When you are cold calling, it’s always imperative to know how to professional voicemail. Part of the goal of making the call is to ensure they hear your message and you make an initial contact. It’s also extremely important to mention the prospect’s name (there is some great dialer software that allows you to do this and still make it pre-recorded.) Here arHow to leave a professional voicemaile six tips that, if you follow, will surely raise your odds of getting that elusive callback.

Professional Voicemail Tips

Smile

Believe it or not, if you smile when you talk, your voice automatically becomes more cheerful, and subconsciously more attractive to the person that is listening to you. That means that if you want to engage the trust of the person that you are calling, smiling while you talk is the best way to create a positive impression.

Anyone who’s been in sales long enough knows it’s not always easy to keep a smile on your face. Cold calling is a numbers game that usually involves more rejections than successes, after all. While that’s the case in most instances, smiling while you leave a professional voicemail can help improve your overall success rate and increase the number of return calls you get.

Have you heard the expression, “Fake it ‘til you make it?” Even if you haven’t, you should keep it in mind when you cold call. While you may not be in a good mood and smiling is the last thing you want to do, forcing yourself to smile and leaving your next business voicemail greeting with cheer in your voice will give you a much better chance of making a sale.

Prepare Your Message First

There is nothing worse than someone rambling on and on in a voice mail message, especially if they never really get across what they are trying to say. That just means that you will never ever get a call back from that person. Instead, prepare a short script that you are going to use for the voice mail – writing it down really helps.

When you get a voicemail from someone you don’t know, what makes you keep listening to it after you hit play? If you’re like many people, it’s the introduction that will compel you to keep listening to the remainder of the message. If the introduction is poor, you’ll probably hang up without listening any longer.

With the greeting being so connected to someone’s decision to keep listening to a voicemail, it’s vital to pay extra attention to your introduction as you prepare your script. Think about the voicemail greetings you’ve gotten in the past that have motivated you to listen to a message in its entirety. What do those examples have in common? Once you identify the elements that make your work voicemail greeting successful, incorporate them into your voicemail script.

Time Yourself

You should never leave a voice mail that is more than fifteen seconds long. That may not seem like a lot of time, but if you time yourself reading your prepared message, you could be surprised! Anything longer than fifteen seconds is going to lose the interest of your listener.

Just like an introduction will influence a person’s decision to continue listening to your voicemail, the content of your message will also sway someone’s decision to listen to your entire message. With 15 seconds being the maximum desired length of a voicemail, you must ensure your professional voicemail greeting is clear, concise and loaded with the information necessary to motivate someone to call you back.

After your introduction, your message should provide a quick breakdown of the information you want the listener to have. While your greeting sh

ould inspire your prospects to keep listening, the content of the rest of your message should be geared toward getting your leads to return your calls instead of deleting your voicemails.

As you time yourself reciting your scripted message, listen to what you’re saying carefully. If your work voicemail greeting includes unnecessary information, remove it from your voicemail. If your message doesn’t contain data that will motivate your prospects to reach out to you, incorporate the relevant information into your voicemails.

Say When You Called

This is great not only for your records but theirs. It means that you can accurately refer to this voice mail in any later correspondence, and hopefully, you will not call them again the next day, forgetting that you have already done it! This will also help your customer track when to respond to you.

When you tell someone the day and time you called them, remember to make a note of it in your records, too. Over time, this practice will help you identify windows of time that produce the highest number of return calls.

If you leave voicemail greetings for homeowners in the evenings instead of the mornings when they’re getting their kids ready for school, they may be more inclined to call you back after dinner. If you leave voicemails for business executives during operating hours instead of overnight, you may get more return calls since your prospects are already in their offices.

Don’t Always Leave Your Company Name

There is nothing we humans love more than a bit of mystery, and mystery is a great way to pique someone’s interest. Always leave your name, of course, but if you do not refer to your company than that person will have to call you back just to find out exactly what you are offering them! This is a great way as well for you to appear more like a person than a faceless corporation.

Remember, the point of cold calling is to establish relationships with your prospects that will lead to new sales in the short-term and repeat sales down the line. You want these relationships to exist between you and your leads, not between your employer and your clientele base. While it’s important for you to be forthcoming with the name of your employer, it’s even more critical for your prospects to remember your name. Prospects can only return your call directly if they know your individual name, after all.

If you’re unsure about the potential benefits of not always leaving your company’s name in your voicemails, conduct an experiment. Divide your leads list in half and include the name of your employer in 50 percent of your voicemail greetings while leaving it out of your other messages. After a set period, see which list produced the highest number of return calls and sales or follow-up appointments.

Always Ask for the Top

Of course, this is not always possible, but it would certainly raise your chances of being taken seriously if you contact the boss of the company rather than their assistant’s secretary. Calling the person at the top of the food chain also means that you will immediately be in contact with someone who actively makes decisions. You do not want to have to wait around for 10 people to make a decision if you only need one person to make that decision.

When you’re leaving a message for a top executive, it’s essential to repeat your phone number, your name and the purpose of your call at the end of your voicemail. Repeating this key information will prevent you from wasting your prospects’ time by forcing them to listen to your message from the beginning again to get this information.

When you make it easy for people to access the information they need to contact you and remind them of why they should call you at the end of your voicemail greetings, it increases the chances they’ll call you back. If you make prospects work to find your contact information or discover why you left them a message, it may frustrate them and prevent them from contacting you or listening to any voicemails you leave for them in the future.

Whether you’re a politician working off voter lists or you’re just trying to sell insurance, these tips and hints are proven to work, over and over again. You may even find that some of them are entirely new to you – or that you have been using two or three of them unconsciously already. Now, that you no longer wonder how to leave a professional voicemail, which tips are you going to use in your next cold call voicemail?

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